Fashion Quiz

Some fashion questions:

  1. In the last half of the nineteenth century, the fashion style was named for what Queen?
  2. In the late nineteenth century, what was a skirt made with straight panels called?
  3. What fine art influenced the dress designs and color of courier Paul Poiret in the teens?
  4. What style of fashion did Gabrielle Chanel introduce in the twenties
  5. Hollywood was the primary fashion inspiration for which decades?
  6. Name three fabrics that were popular for thirties clothing.
  7. Why did the fashions of the forties have regulation length jackets, without pockets or detail?
  8. What is the proper way to store vintage pieces?
  9. What constitutes the fashion called the “New Look” and why was it given that name?
  10. Who was Jackie Kennedy’s exclusive designer in the sixties?

(Scroll down for answers below)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Queen Victoria
  2. A gored skirt
  3. Fauvism and Ballet Russes
  4. Uncluttered clothing and the little black dres
  5. 1930s and 1940s
  6. Silk, satin, organdy, eyelet, pique, gingham, corduroy, knits, wool, velvets, crepe, Lastex, rayons
  7. World War II manufacturing restrictions
  8. The best way to store them is with acid-free tissue and acid-free covered boxes
  9. Christian Dior’s soft shoulders, small waist and full midcalf skirt
  10. Oleg Cassini

VAE 50th Anniversary Book

Have you bought your copy of the VAE 50th Anniversary Book yet? If not, you’re missing out on an extremely interesting book of information on your club and it’s members. There is still time, and the book would made an excellent gift to someone. This is Vermont history in the making.

If you turn to the very last page, you will see some wonderful pictures of the Skinner family. Especially interesting is the picture of Phyllis who is decked out in her Easter finery. Her attire speaks volumes about the 40’s style.

I spoke with Phyllis about her outfit, and interestingly enough, Les remembered more about the colors. She is wearing a dress with a matching hat, short swing jacket with a Peter Pan collar, white gloves, and MaryJane shoes.

The lack of a purse makes me guess that it is in the car. It’s lots of fun to guess the colors of her dress and jacket, and the first person that can guess the correct colors will receive a VAE 50th Anniversary Mug from me as a gift.

When I asked Phyllis if her stockings had a seam in the back of them, she told me a story about a friend who went shopping at Filene’s.

There was a great sale going on for nylon stockings. She couldn’t wait to get home to try them on. Much to her dismay, she realized why they were such a good buy … the stockings had been made with the seam in front!

The thing I disliked the most about nylon stockings, is the fact that they never seemed to stay up properly, and the garter belts were very uncomfortable.

We have a much better deal today with pantyhose. And ladies, did you realize that your pantyhose might someday come in handy to keep your car on the road?

In an emergency they will make a great belt for your cars engine if it should break. It wouldn’t be the first time that an article of clothing or hairpin came in handy, and saved the day getting an engine running again.

Auto Design & Fashion Design

Fashion design is greatly influenced by the automobile and the automobile has been greatly influenced by fashion design. One of the greatest designers was Raymond Loewy, 1893 – 1987, who is called the “Father of Design” it was his influence that started the American Institute of Industrial Design, and whose influence is still felt today with a strong presence on the international scene in the Loewy Group.

Raymond Loewy came to this country from France, and with a young family to support, started out as a window dresser for many of the top stores in New York City. From that point he started illustrating clothing, and many of his fashions made top magazines such as Vogue.

You have seen his designs, many of which are still present today such as the Shell logo. This design became so well recognized that Shell eventually removed its name from the logo. Another very recognizable design is the Lucky Strike packaging along with the Greyhound Bus, S-1 locomotive, Exxon logo, Coca-Cola bottle and many household utensils such as toasters and the Coldspot refrigerator that he designed for Sears Roebuck. He also designed the interior of Air Force One for President Kennedy, and was the designer for the interiors of Saturn I and Saturn V and Skylab. Things we all take for granted today.

Of course, my very favorite design was the Studebaker Avanti. This four-seater sports coupe went from design to production in 18 months and was meant to compete with the Corvette and to help save a dying auto producer. The design was way ahead of anything the other producers were doing, but the price was a little more than the average person’s wages could support, and was only produced for two years 1963 and 1964 under the Studebaker name.

So the next time you pick up a fashion magazine, stop and think that just maybe that illustrator may have a wonderful career designing other things that make our life easier and beautiful.

The 50s (Part II)

Near the end of the decade there were two entirely different silhouettes. Dior designed the “Sack” dress, which later became the chemise, a no-waisted dress that was short and narrow at the hem. In 1958 Yves Saint Laurent produced the second, the trapeze dress, with narrow shoulders, no waist and a triangle shape.

In 1955 Roger Vivier, working with Dior, designed the stiletto heel, a much higher and slimmer look in high heels. The very slim high heel consisted of metal reinforcement and a very pointed toe. Fantastic designs appeared with embroidery, feathers, lace, beading, rhinestones, satin and even fur.

Marilyn Monroe and Jane Mansfield perpetuated this look, along the with eye shadow, penciled eyebrows and short haircuts. Many women wore half hats with their suits and cocktail outfits. Short veils on flowered hats and novelty beach hats were popular, as were turbans.

Handbags consisted of the Wilardy Lucite box, clutch bags were made of a variety of fabrics including alligator, lizard and snakeskin. Novelty designed included the three-dimensional straw animals and fish.

Menswear took on a conservative look. The “Mr. T” silhouette with narrow lapels and soft construction. Men chose gray or blue flannel suits worn with pinpoint collared shirts with narrow small-knotted stripe or solid ties. The all Dacron or rayon suit appeared and was worn year round. Hats had tapered crowns and narrow brims.

For the casual look, the fifties man had many choices. The Eisenhower jacket was a waist-length blouse styled jacket with slant pockets, zipper closure in many color variations. Madras sport jackets & polo shirts were popular as were Bermuda shorts in native prints. Colorful tapered resort slacks, Hawaiian shirts and the Ivy League look with button down collared shirts in a variety of fabrics and colors became very fashionable.

For the first time the style conscious American teenager had fashions designed especially for them. Rock N Roll star Elvis Presley and actor James Dean influenced teen fads from haircuts, to suede shoes and felt skirts.

Girls wore sweaters buttoned backwards and accented them with costume jewelry scatter pins. Cinch belts, bobbi socks, cuffed jeans and hair set in rollers. Boys wore pink shirts, khaki pants, leather jackets and greased hair. Beaches, drive-in movies and soda fountains were the new centers for teenage activity. The fifties led the way to the upcoming “youth explosion” of the sixties.

Are you ready? The Shelburne Fashion Show is just weeks away, and I am hoping to have an even bigger venue than last year. What a wonderful job you all did! Got a friend with an old car? Invite them to not only participate in the car show but also in the fashion show. We have a lot of fun and the best reward is seeing all the smiles.

(Missed Part I? Read it here…)

The 50s (Part I)

After the war, women left their wartime factory jobs and returned to the role of homemaker. Families thrived in the suburbs with station wagons, picture windows, backyard, casseroles and Emily Post. Donna Reed was the perfect picture of the happy housewife dressed in the standard daytime shirtwaist with full circle skirt, and belted waist.

A fancy apron was added to wear at home in the kitchen. Of course, she never left the house without the short white gloves, flowered hat perched on the back of the head and suitable handbag.

Taffeta strapless ball gowns, many in black, with full skirts and wide-collared evening coats, extravagant cocktail dresses in lush colors, fabrics and accessories, were worn for evening wear, along with elbow length gloves and coordinating hats. Mink stoles, cashmere sweaters with fur collars, and jeweled embroidery were the coordinating features.

Chanel returned to designing with her signature cardigan suit and low sling-back shoes. Skirts were mid-calf and pleated at the waist to give fullness. Pucci designed silk scarves, dresses, blouses and stretch bathing suits in bold patterns of purple, pink and crimson.

Poodles were top dog, and appeared on skirts and jewelry. Costume pearls were worn as every day jewelry. Rhinestone-studded sun glasses were the crowning touch to any outfit.

Toreador or Capri pans worn with appliquéd sweaters and ballet slippers were the mainstay of the casual outfit. Circle skirts were made in felt with appliqués of everything from poodles to plants and lobsters.

(Read more in Part II)